A sad day guys

Hey there,

I’ve decided to stop blogging at the Postulating Engineer. Not that I blogged much 😦 I’m sorry about that, but I was just never really passionate about my subject matter, and I got bored and a little sick of scientifically breaking down movies.

So I’ve started a new blog called (originally named) The Postulating Christian. I wanted to continue on with the name, and blog about something I actually will post about. I hope many of you will join me there, even if you aren’t Christian yourself, because I’ll be touching on a whole range of topics and am keen for discussion on all of them.

If anything of excitement happens in the world of engineering, I’ll post here. But until then I’d just like to say it’s been fun! Thanks to everyone who liked and commented! πŸ™‚

Jeremy

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Technology: totally terrifying and terrific in tandem

Ok…so I haven’t posted something in months. I’ve done this before, I may do it again. But I’m here to beg you to give me another chance…again.

I want to kick off these holiday posts with an update into my posting abilities. I’ve recently come into proud possession of a Samsung smart phone. I never realised how much power a person can hold in the palm of his/her hand, certainly more than enough to get one to the moon (at least in 1969).

And with my new found freedom comes the WordPress app πŸ˜€ and so I hope to post more regularly now, what with being able to post anywhere πŸ™‚

Jeremy

Man of Steel: it steals the show (gross)

Ok, so the title is horribly pathetic but it made you laugh a little bit right? πŸ˜›

Superman in handcuffs

Man of Steel being “held” by human handcuffs LOL! (Apologies for the LOL, Β just thought it suited the caption)

After the Β mess that was Superman Returns I was scared for the future of Superman movies. I feared the most recognisable comic book hero would fade from public memory, spurned by the ones who once loved him so…but my fears were alleviated when I watched Man of Steel! πŸ˜€

Christopher Nolan, the director of the Dark Knight trilogy, was a producer for the movie (which is kinda like directing but you get less fame and glory), and the director was Zack Snyder (the man responsible for 300 and the awesome Watchmen). So from the beginning the film was in capable hands. Henry Cavill, the man who plays Superman, does a good job of portraying the god amongst men. Like Batman Returns, it’s a retelling of the origin of Superman. The personal growth and transformation you see Kal-El go through (Clark’s Kryptonian name) is reasonably well done and gets you invested in his story. Lois Lane was perfectly adequate but not anything super special and Lawrence Fishburne’s role as the editor of the Daily Planet is nicely done. The bad guy, played by Michael Shannon, is sufficiently bad but rather well played, as one can almost understand his reasons for doing what he does (despite his rather un-badass haircut).

Ok, so actors – good, story – good. Let’s get down to brass tacks here: is the action amazing enough to be worthy of the Superman legacy?…the answer is a rather resounding yes. There are lots of scenes, too many to mention all of them here but there are a few noteworthy ones: near the beginning Clark is still trying find himself and whathaveyou, and is busy working on a fishing boat near the arctic ocean when the boat gets a distress call from a nearby oil rig. The scenes culminates with Superman saving a helicopter by holding up half the rig, with buckling steel and fire all around it brings out the desperation Superman feels (not being at full strength yet) as he’s trying to save peoples’ lives. The other one I feel is worth mentioning is in the middle of the movie when Superman first encounters the bad guys. I don’t want to spoil it for you, but that was a redonkulous scene, kept my mouth hanging wide open the whole time. So check on awesome action.

Taking into account Superman being…well…super, there aren’t too many glaring inaccuracies, but here are the ones I noticed [SPOILER ALERT]:

  • How did the 20 000 year old scout ship have all that stuff for the 30 year old Superman?
  • Superman punches a hole in the side of a spaceship, resulting in the atmosphere being lost but yet he can still talk to a hologram…hmmm.
  • X-rays don’t work quite like they do in the movie.

[SPOILER ENDED] As always, if I missed any let me know and I’ll edit the post and give you suitable glory and status πŸ™‚

There’s not much more I can say apart from I feel this would be an entertaining movie to Superman fans and general movie goers alike. It gets my recommendation.

Jeremy

Movie time! Star Trek: Into Darkness

Ok, so I thought I’d better write this post before I forget too much of the movie (I’m also going to watch Man of Steel tomorrow:D).

Alrighty then, down to business: Do, or do you not watch it? DO!…it of course depends on whether you like sci-fi, Star Trek or action. Any of those 3 and you’ll enjoy it πŸ™‚ It’s a fitting “follow on” (sequel isn’t quite the right word as the plot has nothing to do with the previous one) to the reboot of the Star Trek franchise. It has Kirk, Spock, Scotty, McCoy, the Enterprise and beaming ups aplenty. The greatest addition to the cast though was Benedict Cumberbatch of Sherlock fame being cast as the bad guy. He is rather good at it…but he seems to be quite good at playing slightly deranged characters πŸ˜›Β The action is fast and fierce, and along with the story,Β will keep you entertained for the 2 hours the movie runs πŸ™‚

SPOILER ALERT:

Ok, there were very few scientific inaccuracies I could pick up (always nice for a sci-fi film), but the notable one was:

  • When the Enterprise is fighting the giant evil Enterprise, the two ships are flying around in space shooting at each other, having a whale of time when suddenly BAM! Good Enterprise gets sucked into Earth’s gravity…unless it had reached orbiting speeds gravity would have affected it the whole time and sucked the Star Ship in sooner, or it would not have affected the ship. Gravity isn’t a binary state.
  • …I watched it a month or so ago and wrote exams in between, so my memory is slightly hazy I’m afraid. If there are others please let me know and I’ll add it to the post πŸ™‚

Keep a close eye out for the Man of Steel review, I’ll write that one on Sunday! πŸ˜€

Jeremy

Exams: the waiting is the hardest part

To quote Tom Petty, “the waiting is the hardest part”.

I recently finished exams (for now anyway)…and the writing of said torture devices is actually ok. I mean, I actually have more free time (I had enough time to watch the new Star Trek, will be my next post!). I eat better, I see more of my friends. On the other hand, from dawn until dusk my life consists of texts and mathematical formulae…but still.

But waiting for my results to be posted is awful. Some exams go bad, bringing great trepidation, some exams go well…bringing slightly less trepidation. I will elaborate with a story!

I wrote the worst exam of my life (literally, none have been as bad marks-wise). And so the waiting was nerve-wracking. So you can imagine the joy I experienced when I saw I passed! At university you need a sub-minimum of 40% for your exam, so as long as your overall average including semester mark is greater than 50% you pass. And I got less than 40% for the exam. So even though my average was 51% I shouldn’t have passed. Except I did. I assumed being in final year they pushed me through, because I was quite close to 40% in my exam…BUT it turns out it was a system error (we get our marks off the ‘net) and I actually got into the supplementary exam. Boom! From pass to supp in 24 hours πŸ˜₯ But I thought I’d go to the perusal where you can examine your script and try and find extra marks and such like…so I had to wait an entire week for that opportunity. This week of waiting was worse than waiting for my actual result! But happily, I went to the perusal today and found out that they had looked at my paper again and found me more marks! πŸ˜€ they just had not reflected it on the system yet πŸ™‚

So the waiting can be a bitter-sweet experience. After that week of waiting, to find out I had passed was an amazing feeling!! πŸ™‚ If you have ever experienced anything like this, drop a comment and we can bemoan our ordeals πŸ˜› Next post will be my review of the new Star Trek πŸ˜€

Jeremy

A student’s life: culinary tales

So, I decided to write this post following pretty much my most unhealthy week as a student ever…and that’s saying something, ’cause I’ve been a student for 3.5 years, and this statement includes infamous first year.

As of tonight I will have eaten take-aways for dinner 5 nights out of my 7 day week…3 of those were pizza. No more words are needed I think.

Other culinary lows I’ve done include:

  • Eating a week’s supply of biscuits in the 15 minutes after taking it back to your room.
  • Eating tomato sauce and steak seasoning on sandwiches because you don’t have anymore peanut butter.
  • Eating peanut butter from the jar with a spoon because you don’t have anymore bread.
  • Eating sandwiches and a can of baked beans for dinner most nights for over a month (this is the one I’m most ashamed of in retrospect).
  • Staying at parties solely for the food…I once left a 21st straight after dessert (I think this is it for most shameful act actually).
  • Going home to mom and dad just for the food (everyone does this, don’t judge me!).
  • Eating raw spinach, carrots, tomatoes and beans with tomato sauce because you are too lazy to cook them (in my defence uncooked vegetables are apparently good for you).
  • Buying pre-made salads because you are too lazy to make your own.
  • Losing weight (which is great) mainly because after leaving home you realise just how much effort it is to make food and so you eat less.

So yeah, those are my confessions with regards to food as a student…I’d like to finish off with a few pros though:

  • I don’t waste food (not that my family ever wastes food, but I’m continuing the trend).
  • If a beggar asks me to buy them food while I’m at the grocery store/supermarket I do it, because if I’m only a student and I can afford to eat nicely (thanks mom and dad) then I can cut back on partying if it means someone else eating for a few days.
  • Finally, in pursuit of a woman my cooking skills have increased. Making chicken cordon bleu (see below) only because I promised to make her dinner one evening is one way of learning new dishes.chicken cordon bleu
  • From pessimistincarnate at blogspot (this isn’t my creation)

    Normal programming will resume shortly πŸ™‚

Jeremy

A literary post: I can do reading me

Yes, it may shock you to realise I am in fact literate and that movies are not my sole source of entertainment πŸ˜› I am in fact an avid reader, and so I feel it is time for a post regarding this.

First off, some very sad news: Ian M. Banks has been diagnosed with gall bladder cancer! It is heartbreaking that anyone should suffer this disease, and the possible loss to the science fiction genre (I never really read his mainstream novels) is also concerning. Obviously though if he were to recover and not write another book I would still be overjoyed. But Ian M. Banks, the man responsible for The Culture novels, is a great asset to my favourite genre and my prayers are with him.

Consider Phlebas and Look to Windward

My two favourites: Consider Phlebas and Look to Windward

Onto more cheerful news, I have recently had what can only be described as the privilege of reading the two latest books from Ken Follet: Fall of GiantsΒ andΒ The Winter of the World.Β This man is a literary genius I tell you. He’s responsible for the two critically acclaimed novelsΒ Pillars of the EarthΒ andΒ World Without End.

Fall of Giants cover

Fall of Giants cover

Both books form part of The Century trilogy, which is based around the 20th century and the wars fought during it. It’s historical fiction, which means that the main characters are fictitious, but the events they witnessed are real and accurately portrayed. The first one is based around WWI and the second around WWII. The books follow families dragged into the war on both sides, and the books follow the same families and the new generations born into each.

Both are incredibly well written books. They have romance, action, historical facts interestingly told, as well as drama, intrigue and excellent character development. And both being around 800 pages long will keep you busy for a while…and books of that length make you look all intelligent-like! πŸ˜›

So yes, in conclusion I would definitely recommend the books to anyone for they really are superb.

Jeremy